Undergraduate courses

020.104(N) Freshman Seminar: From Genes to DNA and Back
A course consisting of introductory lectures followed by student presentations in the form of seminars. The issues analyzed will be: How did we arrive at the concept of the "gene"? Early experiments that gave substance to this concept? How did we arrive at the "one gene, one enzyme" dogma? What is the chemical nature of the gene"? Is DNA enough for regulated gene expression? Is it "all in our genes"? What is genetic plasticity and epigenetics? What about genomics and proteomics?
Instructor: Moudrianakis
1.5 credits, Fall

020.106(N) Freshman Seminar: Tuberculosis
Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an extremely successful intracellular bacterial pathogen able to manipulate phagocytic cells and its own metabolism to survive within a host. The molecular mechanisms of this survival and resistance to antibiotics will be studied.
Instructor:Horner
1 credit, Fall

020.111(N) Freshman Seminar: The 'Nobels' in Medicine and Chemistry
Key events in our understanding of the life sciences will be traced with the aid of Nobel awards.
Note: Freshmen Only
Instructor: Brand
1 credit, Fall

020.113 (N) Freshman Seminar: Microbes in the Media
This seminar discusses scientific issues that are in the news today. Possible topics might include: genomics; adaptation and evolution of bacterial pathogens; emergence of antibiotic resistance; pandemic flu; microbial communities and impact on public health; food safety; bioterrorism; synthetic biology; bioremediation; microbial fuel cells; or other biotechnology topics that could emerge during the semester.
Note: Freshmen Only. Instructor’s permission required for upperclassmen.
Instructor: Cebula
1.5 credits

020.115 Freshman Seminar: Living Off the Sun
This course is a combination of lectures and student presentations that address fundamental principles and also contemporary issues examining the way all forms of Life on Earth are ultimately dependent on sunlight to satisfy their food and energy requirements. Special emphasis will be on current developments in biotechnologies that utilize microbial populations to supply us with fuels and also to clean up environmental hazards. The course will also consider ways to extract lessons from Nature's successful designs and harmonious adaptations so that we, in the long run, can utilize them towards a minimization of our negative impact on the environment.
Note: Freshmen only
Instructor: Moudrianakis
1.5 credits, Spring

020.123 (N) Genomes, Genetics and Evolution An introduction of key principles of genetics, genomics, and evolution
Prereq: Recommended Course Background: Score of 4 or 5 on AP Biology Exam.
An introduction of key principles of genetics, genomics, and evolution. Lectures will alternate lab exercises and discussion of primary literature.
Note: Freshmen Only
Instructor: Spencer
Spring, 4 credits

020.135 (N) Project Lab: Phage Hunting I
This is an introductory course open to all freshman regardless of intended major. No science background is required. This is the first semester of a year-long research-based project lab course in which students will participate in a nation-wide program in collaboration with undergraduates at other colleges. Students will isolate and characterize novel bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) from the environment using modern molecular biological techniques. The course includes two lab meetings per week. Continues in the spring.
Instructors: Schildbach, Fisher
Each semester provides 2 credit hours of Natural Sciences (N) distribution credits and/or counts 2 hours toward the research requirement for the Molecular and Cellular Biology degree.
Fall and Spring

020.136 (N) Project Lab: Phage Hunting II
This is an introductory course open to all freshman regardless of intended major. No science background is required. This is the second semester of a year-long research-based project lab course in which students will participate in a nation-wide program in collaboration with undergraduates at other colleges. In the spring semester, students will annotate the genome of a bacteriophage isolated and characterized by a student in 020.135, in preparation for submission to a database and eventual publication.
Note: Freshman only. Enrollment by permission of the instructor only.
Instructors: Fisher, Schildbach
The course includes two lab meetings per week. Provides 2 credit hours of Natural Sciences (N) distribution credits and/or counts 2 hours toward the research requirement for the Molecular and Cellular Biology degree. No textbook is required.
Spring, 2 credits

020.151 (N) General Biology I
This course begins with an overview of the biosphere, followed by analysis of ecosystem and exploration of animal behavior in the context of ecosystems and evolution. Next, the cellular and molecular basis of life and the energetics of organisms are presented as unifying themes. The biochemistry of organic molecules, factors controlling gene expression, cellular metabolism, and advances in biotechnology represent topics of concentration. Mechanisms of inheritance and evolution are introduced. This course will also include a series of workshops that will explore current trends in research, experimental design and analysis, and molecular modeling.
Note: The Friday workshop is a required part of this course.
Instructors: McCarty, Pearlman, Roberson, Shingles
4 credits, Fall

020.152 General Biology II
This course builds on the concepts presented and discussed in General Biology I. The primary foci of this course will be on the diversity of life and on the anatomy, physiology, and evolution of plants and animals. There will be a special emphasis on human biology. The workshops that were introduced in General Biology I (020.151) will include the use of simulation software, a critique of the primary literature, and an exploration of current trends in medicine.
Instructors: McCarty, Pearlman, Roberson, Shingles
4 credits, Spring
Transfer students (from another university or from the Whiting School of Engineering) may be waived from General Biology 1 and/or General Biology 2 by passing a placement exam.

020.153 (N) General Biology Lab I
Coreq: 020.151
This course reinforces the topics covered in General Biology I (020.151).
Laboratory exercises explore subjects ranging from forest ecology to molecular biology to animal behavior. Students participate in a semester-long project, identifying bacteria using DNA sequencing. Students who have credit for AP Biology but take General Biology Lab I will lose four credits of their overall credit for AP Biology.
Instructor: Pearlman
1 credit, Fall

020.154 (N) General Biology Lab II
Coreq: 020.152
This course reinforces the topics covered in General Biology II (020.152).
Laboratory exercises explore subjects ranging from evolution to anatomy and physiology. Students participate in a project using molecular biology techniques to determine whether specific foods are made from genetically engineered plants. Students who have credit for AP Biology but take General Biology Lab II will lose four credits of their overall credit for AP Biology.
Instructor: Pearlman
1 credit, Spring

020.161 (N) Biology Workshop I
Prereq: Score of 4 or 5 on AP Biology exam
The workshop covers applications and current trends in Biology, through guest lectures from researchers and hands-on computer programs.
Instructor: Pearlman
1 credit, Fall
(Credit will be awarded for either 020.151 or 020.161, but not both)

020.162 (N) Biology Workshop II
Prereq: Score of 4 or 5 on any AP Biology exam.
The Biology Workshop covers applications and current trends in biology, through guest lectures from researchers and hands-on computer programs.
Instructor: Pearlman
1 credit, Spring
(Credit will be awarded for either 020.152 or 020.162, but not both)

020.205 (N) Introduction to Biological Molecules
Prereq: High school level chemistry and biology
This course presents an overview and introduction to basic biochemistry and molecular biology, especially focusing on medicine and biotechnology. Students will be involved in lecture, class discussions, group presentations and laboratory exercises.
Instructors: Shingles, Ketchum
3 credits, Summer

020.214(N) Self Organizing Patterns in Nature
Prereq: 020.305
The manifestations of all biological structures and related functions are the end effect of the formation and maintenance of complex molecular and cellular patterns. These patterns (macromolecules, cellular organelles, cells and tissues) are assembled from their constituent parts under fundamental rules not too dissimilar to those that govern the formation of snowflakes or the dewdrops on a spider web. This course (lectures and student presentations) attempts to describe these common rules and to explain the formation and function of significant biological assemblies.
Instructor: Moudrianakis
3 credits, Spring/even years

020.296 (N) Foreign Gene Expression in E. coli
Prereq: Permission of instructor.
This laboratory, offered during Intersession, will introduce molecular cloning techniques that allow bacteria to be used to produce a particular gene product. Recombinant plasmids, carrying either a single gene or a fusion protein gene, will be constructed and used to transform competent E. coli, and the gene products isolated.
Instructor: Horner
2 credits, Intersession

020.305 (N) Biochemistry
Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors Only
Prereq: 030.101-102; Co-req: 030.205
The molecules responsible for the life processes of animals, plants, and microbes will be examined. The structures, biosynthesis, degradation, and interconversion of the major cellular constituents including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids will illustrate the similarity of the biomolecules and metabolic processes involved in diverse forms of life.
Instructors: Hilser ,YS Lee ,Fisher ,Tifft
4 credits, Fall

020.306 (N) Cell Biology
How the molecules of living systems are organized into organelles, cells, tissues, and organisms will be explored, as well as how the activities of all of these are orchestrated and regulated to produce "life"--a phenomenon greater than the sum of its parts. Considerable emphasis is placed on experimental approaches to answering these questions. Topics covered include biological membranes, cytoskeletal elements, cell locomotion, membrane and protein traffic, the nucleus, second messengers, signal transduction, cell growth, the cell cycle, the extracellular matrix, cell contacts and adhesion, intercellular communication, epithelial structure and function, and the cell biology of cancer.
Instructors: Staff
4 credits, Spring

020.307 (N) Enzymes, Metabolism, and Metabolic Disorders
Prereq: 020.305 or with instructor's permission
This course will cover basic and advanced concepts in enzymology and metabolic processes while focusing on how these processes contribute to human health and diseases. This course is composed of lectures, discussion sessions, and student presentations.
Instructor: Lee Y-S
3 credits, Fall

020.312 (N) Intro to the Human Brain
This course explores the outstanding problem of biology: how knowledge is represented in the brain. Relating insights from cognitive psychology and systems neuroscience with formal theories of learning and memory, topics include: (1) anatomical and functional relations of cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, limbic system, thalamus, cerebellum and spinal cord; (2) cortical anatomy and physiology including laminar/columnar organization, intrinsic cortical circuit, hierarchies of cortical areas; (3) activity-dependent synaptic mechanisms; (4) functional brain imaging; (5) logicist and connectist theories of cognition; and (6) relation of mental representations and natural language.
Instructor: Hedgecock
3 credits, Spring

020.315 (N) Biochemistry Laboratory
Prereq or Coreq: 020.305
This course will reinforce the topics presented in Biochemistry (020.305) through laboratory exercises which use quantitative measurement to study cellular components and processes. Topics include pH, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and enzymes.
Instructor:Horner
2 credits, Fall

020.316 (N) Cell Biology Laboratory
Prereqs: 020.305, 020.315
Prereq or Coreq: 020.306 note that 540.307 is not an accepted co or prerequisite
This course will reinforce the topics presented in Cell Biology (020.306) through laboratory exercises which use visible and fluorescence microscopy to study chromosomes, cell organelles, cell surface receptors, contractile proteins, and microfilaments.
Instructor:Horner
2 credits, Spring

020.317 (N) Signaling in Development and Disease
An advanced undergraduate level seminar on current topics on signal transduction mechanisms underlying neuronal morphology, development and function. The proper functioning of the nervous system relies on the establishment of precise neuronal circuits through a developmental program including proliferation, neuronal migration, axonal growth and neuronal survival. This course pertains to the extracellular cues and downstream neuronal signaling pathways that coordinate these key events during neuronal development. The course will also cover the role of aberrant signaling mechanisms in neuronal degeneration and disease.
Instructor: Kuruvilla
3 credits, Fall/odd years

020.323 (N) Nature at Design: Linking Form to Function
The course begins with an introduction to the theories of optics of photonic and electron microscopies and quickly moves to applied microscopies. The students will be instructed in the methods of biological sample preparation, image acquisition, and processing. This is mainly a laboratory experience. Emphasis is placed on the principles of native sample preservation and on image acquisition through scanning electron microscopies, although other forms of microscopes will also be utilized. The class will be divided into four groups of five students each, and each group will meet twice per week for at least four hours per session. Students who wish, can spend more time with the microscope and image processing.
Instructor: Moudrianakis
2 credits, Intersession

020.329 (N) Microbiology
Prereq: 020.305
This course explores the physiology and genetics of microorganisms within an evolutionary and ecological framework. Concepts in microbiology will be supported by molecular studies of microbial evolution and microbial communities including that of the human microbiome.
Instructors: DiRuggiero, Fisher
3 credits

020.330 (N) Genetics
Prereqs: Recommended pre-reqs 020.306 or 020.151 (or equivalent knowledge of biomolecules); recommended co req 020.305
Recommended Coreq: 020.340
Presentation of the principles of heredity and variation, and their application to evolution and development; physico-chemical nature of the gene; problems of recombination; gene action.
Instructors: Hoyt, Cunningham
3 credits, Fall

020.331 (N) Human Genetics
Prereq: 020.330
This course will examine the growing impact of human genetics on the biological sciences, on law and medicine, and on our understanding of human origins. Topics include structure and evolution of the human genome, genetic and physical mapping of human chromosomes, molecular genetics of inherited diseases and forensic genetics.
Instructor: Hedgecock
2 credits, Fall

020.332 (N) Photosynthesis by Land and Aquatic Organisms (formerly Plant Biochemistry/Physiology)
Prereqs: Recommended Prerequisites: 020.305 OR 020.306 or special permission by the Instructor
This course analyzes the fundamental process of photosynthesis, the process on which all life on Earth depends for its existence. We begin from the level of the structural organization of the photosynthetic machinery, and progress to the essentials of the photophysics of light capture by the primary pigments. Next we follow the conversion of photon flow to electron flow through the electron transport chain and finally we study the formation of chemical gradients that serve as temporary "energy stores" utilized in the synthesis of the essential chemicals that are consumed to drive carbon dioxide and nitrogen fixation and yield biomass. Finally, we compare the properties and specializations of land and aquatic photosynthetic systems that operate in the two different ecosystems.
Instructors: Moudrianakis, Horner
2 credits, Spring

020.334 (N) Planets, Life and the Universe
Prereqs: Three upper level (300+) courses in sciences (Biophysics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, Math, or Computer Science).
This multidisciplinary course explores the origins of life, planets' formation, Earth's evolution, extrasolar planets, habitable zones, life in extreme environments, the search for life in the Universe, space missions and planetary protection.
Instructors: DiRuggiero, Norman
3 credits

020.337 (N) Stem Cells and the Biology of Aging
This will be a team-taught lecture course that focuses on the properties of stem cells, their possible role in cancer (breast and prostate), stem cell aging, and the potential utilization of stem cells for therapy. Topics will include: mechanisms of stem cell renewal, stem cell potency, the impact of the stem cell niche, stem cells and the hematopoietic system, stem cells and the neural system, stem cells in the male and female gonads, induced pluripotent stem cells and cellular reprogramming, stem cell changes with aging, and ethical and policy issues in stem cell research and use. Most lectures will be research-oriented. Students will be expected to read and critically analyze current literature, with an emphasis on the experimental bases from which our current understandings derive.
Instructor: Zirkin
Spring, 2 Credits

020.340 (N) Genetics Laboratory
Prereqs: 020.315, 020.316
Prereq or Coreq: 020.330
This laboratory explores the genetics of living organisms, and students will be required to return to lab on succeeding days to observe and record the results of their experiments.
Instructor: Norris
2 credits, Fall

020.344 (N) Virology
This course will cover basic principles of viral replication and pathogenesis, as well as the host response to viral infection. It will then focus on several viruses of interest, including HIV-1, Influenza, Human Papilloma Virus, Hepatitis C, and Ebola Virus.
Instructors: Beemon, Pitha-Rowe
3 credits, Spring, even years

020.346 (N) Immunobiology
Prereqs: 020.305, 020.306
Coreq: 020.330
A course for upper-level undergraduates that will introduce them to immunochemistry, immunobiology, and clinical immunology. Emphasis is placed on the language, concepts, and experimental methodology of modern immunology and the application of this information to specific human diseases.
Instructor: Edidin
3 credits, Spring

020.347 (N) AIDS
Prereq: 020.306
This course will cover the biology of the infectious agent that causes AIDS, the effects of HIV on the immune system, the search for an HIV vaccine, and the pharmacology of the anti-viral agents that are used to suppress HIV infection.
Instructor: Schroer
3 credits, Spring

020.363 (N) Developmental Biology
Prereqs: 020.305-306; 020.330
Development of invertebrates, vertebrates and plants. The course will emphasize the experimental bases for the fundamental concepts of development.
Instructors: Van Doren, Chen
3 credits, Spring

020.365 (N) Introduction to the Human Skeleton
This course will provide a basic understanding of human skeletal biology, including bone composition and bone growth, recognition of skeletal elements, functional anatomy of different skeletal systems, comparative anatomy.
Instructor: Ruff
3 credits, the next anticipated offering will be 2013/2014

020.367 (N) Primate Behavior and Ecology
A close look at our closest relatives, the primates. Topics include: evolutionary theory, primate evolution, primate behavior and ecology, human evolution, and modern human variation.
Instructor: Perry
Spring, 3 Credits

020.370 (N) Emerging Strategies and Applications in Biomedical Research
Prereq: 020.305 or 020.306 or 080.305 or 080.306; Juniors and Seniors only
In this class, up-to-date primary literature manuscripts related to new discoveries and new strategies that are allowing scientists to make amazing progress in biomedical research will be presented. Examples include: labeling neurons with up to 90 different colors to trace their circuitry, evolution studies in glowing bacteria, detecting several viruses on a single chip and using fiber optics and channel rhodopsin to induce sleep. Students should be interested in reading primary literature research papers and discussing them in class.
Instructor: Hattar
3 credits, Spring

020.371 (N) Emerging Strategies in Understanding Innate Behaviors
The hypothalamus is the central regulator of a broad range of homeostatic behaviors essential to survival, and plays a key role in controlling emotional and appetitive behaviors. This course offers an overview of both historical and recent work on this vital brain region. Topics covered will include the evolution and development of the hypothalamus, control of circadian rhythms and sleep, regulation of hunger and body temperature, as well as hypothalamic regulation of sexual, defensive, and affiliative behavior.
Instructor: Hattar
Spring, 3 Credits

020.373 (N) Developmental Biology Laboratory
Prereq or Coreq: 020.363
The course will include laboratory study of developing vertebrate and invertebrate embryos, analysis of embryogenesis at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ levels.
Instructor: Norris
2 credits, Spring

020.375 (N) Human Anatomy
Prereqs: 020.151-152, Juniors and Seniors Only.
An introduction to the human gross anatomy. It will seek to give students enough background in anatomical knowledge and vocabulary to help them in their initial training in medical school; however, it will not be a substitute for anatomy courses in medical school. It will focus on normal adult anatomy, and it will cover each of the main regions of the body - i.e., thorax, abdomen and pelvis, back and limbs, and head and neck.
Lectures will cover descriptive and functional anatomy, ultimately leaving students with a better understanding of anatomical terminology and 3D relationships of structures within the human body, and better problem-solving skills as they begin to relate symptoms to causes, again at the gross anatomical level.
Instructors: DeLeon, Staff
3 credits, Spring

020.376 (N) Molecular Evolution
A history of life on earth has been recorded in the DNA of organisms that live today. But what language is it and how can we read that history? This course introduces basic principles of molecular evolution plus a wide array of methodologies used to interpret molecular sequence data. Many interesting studies of gene and genome evolution will be covered as examples of this burgeoning area of research. This fun and popular course now includes computer labs that will enable students to obtain first-hand experience in this exciting field of research.
Instructors: Cunningham
3 credits

020.379 (N) Evolution
Prereqs: 020.306; 020.330 or permission required.
This course takes a broad look at the impact of Natural Selection and other evolutionary forces on evolution. Emphasis is placed on what we can learn from genome sequences about the history of life, as well as current evolutionary pressures.
Instructor: Norris
3 credits, Fall

020.380 (N) Eukaryotic Molecular Biology
Prereq: Biochemistry OR Genetics
The field of molecular biology is fundamental for those interested in modern biological research and medicine. In this course students examine DNA, RNA and protein synthesis (i.e., the "central dogma" of molecular biology) in molecular detail, as well as how these processes are regulated and interrelated. There is significant examination of molecular structure-function relationships, with particular emphasis on RNA synthesis and processing and chromosomal organization, nucleosome regulation and epigenetics. Modern and fundamental experimental techniques and concepts are explored in detail. Students will learn how to use some genome databases and bioinformatics tools available online to improve their molecular biology research skills and knowledge. Readings are both from scientific journals as well as a textbook that includes interactive online content.
Instructors: Zappulla, Moudrianakis, and Beemon
3 credits, Fall, two 1.5-hour sessions per week

020.395 (N) Fundamentals of Biological Light Microscopy
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Introduction to the principles, practice, and application of light microscopy (LM) to biomedical research. The course will cover light optical theory; instrumentation design, use, and applications; and will afford students 'hands-on' experience in both specimen preparation and microscope operation (including epifluorescence, confocal, and deconvolution light microscopes).
Instructor: McCaffery
2 credits, Intersession / even years

020.397 (E, N) Fundamentals of Biological Electron Microscopy
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Introduction to the principles, practice, and application of electron microscopy (EM) to biological/cell biological research. The course will cover electron optical theory; instrumentation design, use, and applications; and will afford students 'hands-on' experience in both specimen preparation and electron microscope operation (including both transmission and scanning electron microscopes).
Instructor: McCaffery
2 credits, Intersession / odd years

020.401-402 Seminar: Current Progress in Cellular & Molecular Biology
This is a weekly seminar designed for graduate students enrolled in the M.S. program. The seminar involves student presentations of research and discussing topics of current interest in the field. Instructor: Staff
3 credits, 020.401 is offered in the fall, and 020.402 is offered in the spring

020.420 (N) Build-A-Genome
Prereq: Permission of instructor.
Must understand fundamentals of DNA structure, DNA electrophoresis and analysis, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and must be either a) Experienced with molecular biology lab work or b) Adept at programming with a biological twist. In this combination lecture/laboratory "Synthetic Biology" course students will learn how to make DNA building blocks used in an int'l. project to build the world's first synthetic eukaryotic genome, Saccharomyces cerevisiae v. 2.0. Please study the wiki www.syntheticyeast.org for more details about the project. Following a biotechnology boot-camp, students will have 24/7 access to computational and wet-lab resources and will be expected to spend 15-20 hours per week on this course. Advanced students will be expected to contribute to the computational and biotech infrastructure. Successful completion of this course provides 3 credit hours toward the supervised research requirement for Molecular and Cellular Biology majors, or 2 credit hours toward the upper level elective requirement for Biology or Molecular and Cellular Biology majors.
Instructors: Bader, Zeller
4 credits, Fall and Spring

020.441-442 (N) Mentoring in Biology
Prereq: Permission of instructor, 020.151-152, S/U only.
This course provides students who have taken General Biology I and II the opportunity to mentor new students in General Biology I and II. Mentors collaborate with faculty on how to lead effective sessions, help students teams complete team assignments, and generally help students understand difficult concepts and principles in biology. Mentors must have a firm command of the topics covered in biology and must meet with both faculty and students through the course of the semester.
Instructor: Pearlman, Shingles
1 credit, Fall and Spring

020.451 (N) Build-A-Genome Mentor
Prereq: Permission of instructor.
In addition to producing and sequencing DNA segments like regular B-a-G students, mentors will help prepare and distribute reagents, and maintain a Moddle site to track student reagent use and productivity. Mentors will also be expected to mentor specific students who are learning new techniques for the first time, contribute to the computational and biotech infrastructure associated with Build-a-Genome, and pursue at least one independent research project. Successful completion of this course provides 3 credit hours toward the supervised research requirement for Molecular and Cellular Biology majors.
Instructors: Bader, Zeller
4 credits, Fall and Spring

020.501-502 Introduction to Independent Study in Biology
Freshmen and Sophomores only
Prereq: Permission of full-time faculty member in Biology Department.
Program of study and reading under the tutelage of a faculty member on those topics not specifically listed in the form of regular courses.
1 to 3 credits based on work equivalent to class-based courses, S/U only.

020.503-504 Introduction to Research in Biology
Freshmen and Sophomores only

Prereq: Permission of full-time faculty member in Biology department.
Research involves planning and conducting experiments, collection and analysis of data, reporting of results. Usually students are not prepared for research or independent study until their junior year. These courses are offered to accommodate the exceptional freshman or sophomore who has already had extensive laboratory and/or course experience enabling him/her to undertake advanced work.
1 to 3 credits, S/U only.

020.505-506 Internship in Biology
Prereq: Consent of Advisor.
Practical work experiences which have an academic component as certified by a member of the faculty.
1 credit, S/U only.

020.511-512 Independent Study
Junior and Senior only
Prereq: Permission of full-time faculty member in Biology department.
Program of study and reading under the tutelage of a faculty member on those topics not specifically listed in the form of regular courses.
1 to 3 credits based on work equivalent to class-based courses, S/U only.

020.513-514 Research Problems
Junior and Senior Only

Prereq: Permission of full-time faculty member in Biology department.
Planning and conducting original laboratory investigations on biological problems, collection and analysis of data, reporting of results.
1 to 3 credits, S/U only.

020.551, 020.552, 020.553, 020.554 Mentored Research Program in Molecular & Cellular Biology
These courses provide B.A./M.S. students with intensive research experience for a full academic year. Students in the program work under the direction of a research mentor on an original research project, produce a written report in the form of a thesis, and make a presentation of the work to the Biology Department.


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